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Nuclear Power: A Burden or a Blessing? *

CASELET, STRATEGY
ET Cases - FLAME, 6 Pages
AUTHOR(S) : Akash Mandaliya, Preetam Singh Negi, Abhijit Mahida, Alap Patel - PG Students, Abhijat Arun Abhyankar- Associate Professor - NICMAR, Pune

Case Preview

Nuclear Power: A Burden or a Blessing?

 

Energy is one of the deciding factors for a country’s economic growth, as the population increases so does the demand for the energy. India has a total of 288,664 MW installed capacity of electricity generation (as on February 29th 2016). Nuclear contributes merely 2% of total electricity generation [1]. The energy production technologies are associated with some advantages as well as disadvantages, which could be in terms of environment, cost, safety, efficiency etc. Nuclear energy thus comes with its own set of positives and negatives. The accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear plant in Japan during March 2011 was an alarming event in the world, which led to question of safety on every Nuclear reactor in the world, and was an added factor for opposition to construct the Nuclear reactor [2]. Apart from the safety issues, Nuclear energy is a very clean source of energy as it has very few Green House Gases (GHG) emissions. A comparative study for Nuclear power versus fossil-fuel power with carbon-dioxide (CO2) capture and storage shows that the electricity cost based on life cycle cost for Nuclear power is less than the fossil-fuel power with provision for CO2 capture and storage [3].............

Nuclear Energy Scenario

Nuclear Energy-Worldwide

As of December 2015, total 30 countries are producing energy with Nuclear fission reactors. The total Nuclear electrical capacity in the world is 382,454 MW. The USA, France, Japan, China and Russia are the top five countries of the world in terms of number of reactors and total net capacity of Nuclear energy production..........

Nuclear Energy-India

At present, India has 21 operative Nuclear reactors having total capacity of 5,780 MW and six under construction having total capacity of 4,300 MW, which makes it fourth largest source of electricity in the country [7]. India has “Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Act, 2010” which makes operator of Nuclear power plant i.e., Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd..................

Case Study

Case 1 – Kudankulam Nuclear Power Plant (KNPP)

Atomstroy Export, a subsidiary of the Russian State Nuclear Energy Corporation Rosatom, has reached a deal to build sixteen Nuclear reactors in India. From the two of these units, of 1,000 MW each, one is operational and the other is currently under construction in Kudankulam, Tamil Nadu................

Case 2 – Jaitapur Nuclear Power Plant (JNPP)

One of major upcoming project of Nuclear Power is in Jaitapur, consisting of six Nuclear reactors having capacity of 1,650 MW each, thus generating a total of power of 9,900 MW, which will make it the largest in the world. The JNPP is located at Madban village of Ratnagiri district in Maharashtra and is shown in Figure 2. A MOU was signed between NPCIL and AREVA on February 4th 2009 for first twin set of EPR....................

Summation

Nuclear energy due to its low Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission intensity in comparison to other conventional and renewal energy sources, addresses the global climate change and global warming. The radioactive wastes from nuclear power plant are kept isolated from the environment. Also, the radioactive waste dumping at sea is either banned or regulated by international bodies. In India, the radioactive release within 30 km of the power plant is monitored by collecting regular samples of air, water and land by ESL monitoring agency..........

Assignment Questions

I. Energy security is one of the problems hindering the growth of India. Do you agree?
II. .............

Exhibits

Exhibit I: Comparison Between Nuclear and Thermal (Coal) Power Plants

Teaching Note Preview

Nuclear Power: A Burden or a Blessing?

 

Synopsis

Energy is one of the deciding factors for a country’s economic growth, as the population increases so does the demand for the energy. India has a total of 288,664 MW installed capacity of electricity generation (as on February 29th 2016). Nuclear contributes merely 2% of total electricity generation. The energy production technologies are associated with some advantages as well as disadvantages, which could be in terms of environment, cost, safety, efficiency, etc. Nuclear energy thus comes with its own set of positives and negatives. The accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear plant in Japan during March 2011 was an alarming event in the world, which led to question of safety on every Nuclear reactor in the world, and was an added factor for opposition to construct the Nuclear reactor. Apart from the safety issues, Nuclear energy is a very clean source of energy as it has very few Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. The study compares Nuclear and Thermal (Coal) power plants for various parameters.......

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Abstract

India is one of the fastest developing countries in the world which has a large population under darkness that hampers its economic growth. Energy security is one of the important factors, which decides the economic health of the nation. The first thing, which India needs to work on to become a developed nation, is to meet the electricity demand. One form of energy that can reduce energy deficit is Nuclear energy. Nuclear energy is always associated with negative notions related to its safety. Nuclear energy can play a significant role in combating climatic change. This case deals with the dilemma of Nuclear energy as a solution to address energy security problem of India. This case highlights issues associated with two Nuclear power plants namely, Kudankulam and Jaitapur and comparison between Nuclear power plant and Thermal (Coal) power plant in different parameters.


Pedagogical Objectives

  • Understand the need of Nuclear power plant
  • Identify the various advantages and disadvantages of Nuclear power generation
  • Study issues and challenges w.r.t., Nuclear power plants in India

Case Positioning and Setting
This case can be used for teaching courses like Introduction to Nuclear Science and Engineering, Public Policy and Environment Management.


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